Sunday, May 19, 2013

More goats in cars... This time it's personal

Actually... A goat and a sheep... And a truck, not a car. OUR truck.


Meet Weber (katahdin sheep) and Traeger (boer goat). Both are wethers (that's a castrated male, for those not in the know). The BBQ names are based on the condition I set down for hubby... We will NOT be keeping these guys forever. They go to butcher in the fall. They are currently installed in our front goose pen, mowing down the grass. They'll eventually go in the back pig pen, to take care of the grass and brush back there all summer. Omg... I have a freaking goat again... Doing my best to not panic... Lol.

Oh, and deputy guinea is NOT pleased! He will not shut up. He absolutely does not approve of the intruders. 

Weber doesn't want anything to do with us, so I wasn't able to snap any good camera phone pics of him... Traeger is all about the camera, though.

5 comments:

Michelle J said...

We've had a pair of guinea hens for just about two months now. We got them when we were having coyote problems. We were sold on the idea that they'd be our alarm system - and that they are, alright. They honk at every passing jogger, any bird that flies a little too close for comfort, trees, shadows, etc...

We have replaced the adage "the boy who cried wolf" with "the girls who honked coyote". ;)

Congrats on your new wethers. I can't wait to hear more about life with sheep, as they've always intrigued me. Is their care much different from that of goats?

Carolyn said...

Yum :)
Is it wrong to say that when looking at cute livestock?

Paula said...

How did you come by goats again?

D.Hausmann said...

Sounds like you are into a good life style. It is truly amazing how much you can raise on a small place. If Livestock doesn't have a regular purpose i.e.; fiber, milk, cheese, then it's usually for food protein and there is nothing wrong with food not factory processed.

Rae said...

Paula, hubby's been begging for a goat for about a year. I finally gave in on the conditions that I got a sheep, and that they weren't permanent.